Oh Spirit Hoods.

July 9, 2011 — 35 Comments

Oh Spirit Hoods. One of those fashion trends that makes me pause, cock my head, and say “really??” If you’re unfamiliar (meaning you’re not one of the 15,000+ people who “like” the brand on facebook), Spirit Hoods are furry animal hat/scarf combos that are all the rage with tweens, celebs, and hipsters alike. I’ve gotten a few tips recently about the company, particularly their use of the tag-line “join the tribe”:


http://spirithoods.com/about-2/

At first, I was annoyed by the tag line, but found the whole concept of wearing an disembodied stuffed animal on your head so ridiculous, figured it wasn’t worth the fight. They also don’t focus solely on what I would call the stereotypical mystical, Native animals (wolves, bears, deer, buffalo, owls, etc), they have pandas, leopards, and lions as well. But then, I started exploring their site further, and I got a tip about their new “Navajo wolves” line. And boy did I change my mind.
 

The “Navajo Wolves” collection are the wolf hoods, lined in Pendleton-style fabric.

For each “animal” they provide a description of what the “animal spirit” represents–traits and characteristics that the wearer will somehow embody. And the accompanying description for the “Navajo Black Wolf” is just fantastic:

Black Wolf-Navajo
Mysterious » Shapeshifter » Beauty

The black Wolf spirit has unmatched ferocity, cunning, stealth, confidence, and loyalty. They howl at the moon and are great communicators with a strong appreciation of music. This animal spirit feels at home within order and chaos. Often a teacher or dancer with keen senses, these warrior spirits will also defend their ground. The Black Wolf is in touch with lunar influences and the shadow within. This healer brings the magical spirit-medicine.

Deep breath. Ready? Let’s looks at this critically. How many stereotypical “Indian” traits can we fit into a short paragraph? So apparently Navajos are described by the terms “mysterious, shapeshifter, beauty”–because we’re all like twilight and turn into wolves. Though, it’s an interesting reference to skinwalkers too (f you want to be scared s***less, have a Navajo tell you some of those stories. ::shudder::). Then we’ve got the “warrior spirit” and “brings the magical spirit-medicine”–basically every line of this description reads like a bad Indian fantasy novel. We’ve got the warrior stereotype, the connected with nature and the environment stereotype, the wise teacher stereotype, the mystical healer stereotype, the musical stereotype…on and on and on. “But,” you may be saying, “it’s about a wolf, not an Indian, you silly blogger-woman!” I think it’s fairly obvious the connection they’re trying to make with the Pendleton fabric and calling the darn thing a “NAVAJO” wolf.

So, a few brave Native Approps readers took the issue head-on over at “Kingdom of Style”. Look for the comments by “Mea.” The fascinating part comes from a comment by the Co-Founder of Spirit Hoods–this is the philosophy of the company, straight from the horse’s mouth. Another deep breath may be necessary, and try to read past all of the misspellings and grammar errors:

This is a good topic for discussion, and in fact we at SpiritHoods have taken a lot into consideration when it comes to Native American culture. In no way are we trying to demean or prostitute Native American’s, in fact their way of life has been so inspiring to us that it has forced us to evaluate our lives and everything we do within it. For instance us four owners went to a traditional native American sweat lodge out here in California together. If anything we are inspired by native culture and their respect for the land and it’s animals, but not just Native American’s, native’s all over the world.
The animal headdress is seen in many cultures, Alaskan natives, American natives, South American natives, African natives etc. The Spirit of the animal and our connection to it is seen in cultures all over the world and we believe it is innate within us. Hence the importance of Product Blue and why we give back to non-profits that help in the rehabilitation of these animals.
Native American’s see this duality and the importance of our co-existence and protecting it. If anything we are trying to help perpetuate that.
We try our very best to respect all people and cultures in everything we do, we are inspired by their designs, their philosophies and what we want to do with SpiritHoods is embrace self expression with a foundation of giving back.
If your interested in more about this topic here is a good read:

http://thesocietypages.org/socimages/2010/04/13/american-indian-is-in/
and check out out http://www.spirithoods.com/problue/ to learn more about how we support the animals
Alexander Mendeluk

CO-Founder/Director of Design&PRSpiritHoods www.spirithoods.com/problue

Wow, thank you, Alexander for telling all of us what exactly Native Americans (all of the millions of us) think! and thank you for realizing that there is only one “Native American culture” and that we are all exactly the same! and thank you  for finding our way of life (since we only have one!) “inspiring”–since marginalization, colonization, and ongoing poverty are awesome, right? and thank you for going to a “traditional Native American sweat lodge” so you now have the first-hand experience and knowledge to speak for all of us! and finally, thank you for considering the animals first. I’m glad to know your “foundation of giving back” doesn’t extend to the people that your product is so clearly “inspired by”–that would be silly!

Dripping sarcasm aside, I love the irony of him linking the SocImages post that’s a summary of my blog. Talk about missing the point.

Honestly though, it’s a hard line, because clearly Alexander and Spirit Hoods don’t think they’re being offensive. They truly believe that going to a “traditional Native American sweat lodge” is enough to force them “to evaluate our lives and everything we do within it,” they truly think they are showing respect to Native peoples and cultures. 


So how do we go about addressing something as deep as this? That’s a struggle I have with many of these examples–if the owners read this, they are going to get defensive and dismissive, and not actually think deeply about what effects their actions are having on the collective American consciousness about Native peoples. Especially when their products are making them hella cash (each retails for $150) and are all the rage–what motivation do they have to change? So if we can’t change the company, let’s change from the ground up: Don’t buy from Spirit Hoods, because they promote the stereotyping of Native peoples, the appropriation of our tribal names and traditions, encourage the problematic practice of “playing Indian”, and the company philosophy is based off of a harmful romanticized vision of Native cultures. 

Spirit Hoods Official Website: http://spirithoods.com/
Kingdom of Style: The Night Owl



(Thanks Jackie, DC, Christi, Alyss, and the others who sent this in!)

Adrienne K.

Posts

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/08715870929591609469 silvii tron

    I remember that guy on another article somewhere. Here’s his imdb profile http://www.imdb.com/name/nm2992197/. I remember him talking about his experience working on “Twilight” and how it inspired him with his business and then there’s this cheesy photograph with two of the “wolfpack” guys from Twilight. One of them is wearing the offending spirit hoods – as a joke I’m hoping and the other is just laughing (I’m guessing) at the absurdity.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/10107950410071603461 bonfire of my vanity

    sweet baby jesus, that is the ugliest thing i have ever seen in all the days of my life. what on earth is wrong with people???

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/04980962679277700220 ROXYMUZAK

    How many things are wrong with that guy’s response?! It’s a Where’s Waldo of missing the point.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/05049442534437457900 Jessica

    I thought these were stupid and ugly before, but now they’re stupid and offensive too. Great going, Mr. Mendeluk!

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/13656729462144768052 Teresa

    I had no idea these things were supposed to be Spirit Hoods. I thought they came from designer plush designs or manga culture. This is really distressing!

  • http://snuffycup.livejournal.com/ snuffycup

    There is so much privilege dripping from Alexander’s quote, seriously dude unpack that privilege knapsack!

    Claiming a culture for your own use just because you think it’s cool, especially a culture that has been/continues to be marginalized and oppressed isn’t appreciation, it is the definition of appropriation. And regardless of intent, once something has been pointed out as inappropriate by a marginalized group or person, the person committing said inappropriate act needs to stop doing it.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/15613914622115214781 Gwen

    I seriously cannot believe he used a link to Soc Images about appropriation of native cultures, drawing on your awesome posts, as some type of support for his argument! I have not laughed this much in a veyr long time.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/04451499658709230687 pagesofnothing

    This comment has been removed by the author.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/15469173565648873918 Jadehawk

    that’s just…

    I mean, hats with animal ears can be cute and whatnot. They can be done in an entirely non-appropriating manner (a friend of mine has a “lizard” sweatshirt which is neat). but no, you have to make them “tribal”. grrness

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/15469173565648873918 Jadehawk

    This comment has been removed by the author.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/15469173565648873918 Jadehawk

    also, do I get to whine at this “businessman” not being able to tell the difference between it’s and its, and writing plurals as ‘s, or is that too nitpicky and off-topic?

    anyway, this is the kind of “liberalism” that drives me up the tree. Privileged people claiming that they’re the “good guys” and that they’re somehow incapable of appropriation/oppression/colonization/whatever the offense because they “understand”. That’s pure and unadulterated privilege denial. And I hope if (or more likely, when) I’m guilty of it, I get appropriately hit over the head with a cluebat.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/18238917385277027729 Claire

    Aghghghh that is just… Frustrating. I bought one of the wolf hats for my sister and was planning on getting one for myself (YES I know they are SILLY but I am a dork and will own my awkward fashion sense), but seeing it in this racialized light is completely disappointing. As if the “Navajo Wolf” variations weren’t offensive enough, the founder’s response just compounds it. It REEKS of privilege and noble savagery.

    I just dont’ get why they had to go down this road! It is completely possible to make animal hats without idealizing some generic “Native American” culture. Boooo.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/12211611697286448092 papa bear

    we could make a ‘I hate spirithoods’ facebook and see how many likes we can gather…

    great blog!!!

  • http://zkty.livejournal.com/ zkty

    When I first read that comment made by the co-founder, I did not understand for the life of me why they decided to link to that SocImages page. It completely goes against what they were saying and just affirms why they’re totally wrong.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/14029549865473069051 Polenth

    Claire said: I just dont’ get why they had to go down this road! It is completely possible to make animal hats without idealizing some generic “Native American” culture. Boooo.

    That’s what baffled me. The pictures are cuddly teddy-bear heads with dangles. The sort of thing you’d imagine a soft toy company making. It doesn’t mesh with all the stuff about ferocity and transforming yourself by wearing one. You wouldn’t look at one, without the marketing stuff, and think they related to Native Americans.

    It’s like the person who designed them, and the person who did the marketing, had totally different ideas in mind. That it was apparently the same person just makes it more bizarre.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/13795999538116521025 Lord of the Eeple

    Woah. I live a sheltered existence. I have never seen one of these hoods before.

    Actually, I am kind of charmed and since I am a childish person I’d rather like one.

    But the marketing, even the branding name, is offensive. I want a fuzzy animal hat, not some wankery about ‘spirit animals’ and transformation experiences. Marketing faux fur as spiritually significant, eeeek.

    I have one of these hats: http://www.etsy.com/listing/26308655/plush-squid-hatpillow-hot-pink-with and the transformation that occurs when I am wearing it is an undefinable experience.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/10260737577635599363 MendelsonPhoto

    I love your blog and am equally disgusted. May I interject a bit on this business of ‘spirit hoods’?

    Over 15 years ago, wearing furry hats was an underground rave/ club kid thing. We didn’t reference native cultures at all.

    Over 10 years ago it reached the Burning Man community. Wearing fake fuzzy fur was popular out there as it gets cold at night. Also for people who are in ‘altered states’ the comfort of touching fur feels good for them.

    As fashion is always late to the party, some jackasses appropriate the underground culture of what is already a VERY TIRED look. So they market the hell out of it, slap on this awful disrespect to your traditions and culture, and voila… ‘spirit hoods’.

    Just wanted to tell you that this look doesn’t have its roots in appropriations. It has its roots in the kids who just liked fuzzy things.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/09010586214759124740 ZombiezuRFER

    Holy crap, I see them looking more like ewoks than any sane person. Why the whole spirit thing if it’s going to be that bad? I agree, this really is one of those headscratching products.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/01478763837213733775 Rob

    Not to mention the fact that the Navajo reservation doesn’t have many wolves. And wolves aren’t a big part of their culture, unlike elsewhere.

    Grey wolves used to roam the Diné homeland. But they’re not as impressive as the mysterious “black wolf.”

    http://www.navajozoo.org/Animals_Wolf.htm

    And the misinformation spreads:

    http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20110409202038AAQWYVx

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/09201030685132704499 W

    OK, I have a serious question.

    So, the boyfriend, who’s mother is Choctaw/Seminole, gave him a handful of tacky tourist dream-catchers that she just happened to have in her car on her last visit (go figure.)

    Anyway, the dream catchers are clearly marked “made in China,” but the packaging bears the name of St. Joseph Indian School, which my cursory internet research shows to be this: http://www.stjo.org/site/PageServer?pagename=about_our_school

    So, what is the moral arbitration on such a thing?

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/09201030685132704499 W

    ^ er, to edit the above, the St. Joseph Indian school is NOT to be confused with the defunct “St. Joseph Indian Normal School.”

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/06424461028490374071 Unknown

    i hate to say this. but stop hating on things. this world is full of negativity and hate. Like really if you all took the time and energy to find all the things that you find to be “horrible” about this company why don’t you try and look at some of the positive things that they are doing and focus on that. Why do people always have to find something bad about things and make it there focal point. Love the world love each other and stop trying to find things to be upset or disappointed in. i love this company and the things they are doing. i don’t see any other companies out there that promote a since of family with there clothing line. The “join the tribe” is more than just some catch phase to boost there sales. It is a phrase saying join the family and love each other. I own a spirit hood and iv meet several other people randomly that i do not know that also had them on. Now we are friends and i talk to them all the time and look forward to the next time we get to hang out. That sense of community is what “join the tribe” really means. Community is something that is rapidly fading from our country and everyone lives in this me myself and I world. time to brake that habit and realize your not the only one in the world.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/05721228519900704211 Jadey

    I can’t believe he cited the Sociological Images page. I can’t believe it. On the pains of sanity, I refuse to believe that he actually read it (rather than just skimmed for the pictures) and didn’t recognize that it was talking about douchebags *just like him*. Who can be that thick??

    Face, meet palm.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/05342557841777099838 Nancy Marie

    I think they went a bit far linking it with the Native American culture. But I think that is just his view. When it comes to the people who are buying them its for fun. A conversation starter. A way to meet people. That is the true purpose of the spirit hoods. Do I own one? Heck no those things are crazy expensive. Would I wear it if I had one? Sure. Why not? It would drive my 11 year old daughter crazy. They look fun and would be warm in the winter.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/13795999538116521025 Lord of the Eeple

    Aw, Unknown. Really, they could have all that without stepping on Native cultures. “Join the family.” “Join the pack.” “Join the pride.” “Join the taxonomic class ‘Mammalia’ no wait you’re already a member.”

    Part of realizing that you are not the only one in the world is realizing that doing something good does not erase doing something bad. Spirit Hoods may indeed have done something good for you, Unknown, but they’re doing something bad Adrienne and others. They just told you about it. Practice realizing that you’re not the only one in the world by listening.

    Nancy Marie — I am so amused by the darn things that I looked about. There are some etsy sellers who make very similar hats for less, and minus the weird marketing. (Though I did have the misfortune of encountering a page with a nearly-naked white woman with a fox pelt tied to her head with little leather laces, complete with a reference to ‘skin-walker ritual’ in the text. Etsy is hilarious.)

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/05954473453593995222 Tucker

    You guys are amazing. You are taking a product that actually adds happiness to the world and make it come off as some jab at native americans. Spirithoods have changed my life and inspired me to start a movement to get the world to realize that being happy is a decision (one that it seems like many of you on here need to make). Just google Yay Life Tribe to find our Trailer to the documentary we are making. You should also get used to seeing Spirithoods…. this is only the beginning.

    I would be honored if you would join our tribe.

    Tucker, Chief Of The Yay Life Tribe

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/17312091976715656673 Lame Deer

    Are SpiritHoods bad? They help people who believe in them. They give money to protect wildlife? What are doing to really help anyone?

    Elizabeth Johnson December 30, 2010 at 9:09pm Report
    Oh my gosh! What an honor,k seriously, to Fb meet you! I am in love with my Spirithood. I am speechless you would like to know more about me. I am pretty much an open book so I would be more than happy to tell you anything. But, I will give you a run down.

    I grew up on an Indian Reservation in Montana, so Native American culture is very important to me. I have always been a mega nerdy, overachiever. My luck sort of changed when I got out of high school, I moved away from the reservation and married a man who was very abusive and almost killed me. But I survived, moved back onto the reservation, finished college and tried to put my life back together.

    My health had started seriously declining the past two years. I have had 19 surgeries, many abdominal, three on my brain, for various problems. There were days when I felt like I was going to die and several times I almost have. But I have tried to keep a positive attitude and always reach out to help people in need. I always try to spend time with sick children, help shelter animals, donate to good causes, I know there are people a lot worse off than me.

    I was at a doctor appointment on a particularly bad day when I ran into an elderly Native American gentleman. He looked at me, took my hand, and sat, “Don’t worry child, you will survive. You have the spirit of the wolf inside.” Even since then I have been trying to do what I can from home to help with wolf conservation. I feel such a connection to them.

    When I first heard about Spirithoods from Jen Friel, I fell in love with the wolf! I had to have it! After surgeries, wearing my bit of love and connection to my spirit animal really gives me strength to fight. I think you guys are an amazing company that connects people from all over and from all walks of life. So incredible. What a gift to share.

    I currently am the proud owner of the red wolf Spirithood. Which I basically live in! I would truly be honored if you guys would like to gift me any of the other wolf hoods.

    If there is anything else you would like to know, please just ask, and thank you so much for connecting. ♥

    SpiritHoods December 30, 2010 at 10:23pm
    Elizabeth you are amazing! Your attitude, strength , and courage is beautiful. SpiritHoods can learn from you. We evolved from the basic principal of forming a “Tribe” and spreading something that we didn’t fully understand but knew was positive. Hearing your story and how you are connected and inspired by the animal spirit gives us even more clarity in our vision. The symbol that you represent is the essence of what we believe in and what we want to share with other humans and animals. You are a warrior….a peaceful warrior. All of us would love to continue to hear you thoughts and support you in anyway possible.

    Elizabeth Johnson December 30, 2010 at 10:28pm Report
    Thank you so very much! That means so much to me. I really think you guys have an amazing vision. I am happy for you to share whatever you would like to. And I would be happy to share whatever you would like me to in the future.
    Elizabeth Johnson

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/17892082475707349215 Bird Wicks

    I have a random question about “Spirit Hoods.” Are they manufactured in a way that is environmentally sustainable/friendly? If they are donating a portion of the money they make from their absurdly expensive and ridiculous hats to “animal charities” are they also making sure that the manufacture, shipping, etc ISN’T negatively affecting animals? They certainly aren’t making sure they aren’t offending minority cultures. Wearing a piece of fabric on your head may remind you of the animal that you bought but do you really know anything about those animals? Do you REALLY care about them? Are you living a spiritual and environmentally aware life because you own this hat? If not then you are just another lame person wearing an overly priced stuffed animal on your head. Fashion does not equal awareness, education, pride or effort; it equals money and privilege (that isn’t to say that fashion CAN’T come from awareness it just often doesn’t). If you really want to help out the animal charities donate the $150 to them. They’ll send you a nice gift free usually and you’ll KNOW you’ve done the MOST you can to help them out. Companies that pretend to “get it,” in any capacity (in this case culturally and environmentally), while getting rich off of people drive me batty!

    And one more quick thought. Spirit animals were meaningful to many indigenous cultures. Connection to that animals meant something to be certain. They also ACTIVELY practiced connection to ALL things. To claim that these hats help people realize they are a part of the earth and not apart from it is not only misuse of native/indigenous cultures but a gross misunderstanding of what interconnectedness and being part of the earth means. Be part of the earth by respecting ALL beings, by respecting water and earth. Buying a hat from a FOR PROFIT company that is not a non-profit conservation/preservation/education/etc company likely makes you less connected to all things.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/04726124386457679725 Erica

    Wow! Spirit hoods, wow…. sorry to break it to you folks but $5 of faux fur doesn’t make something spiritual. And using stereotypes of first/native peoples to make your company seem more spiritually legit is just wrong. It’s disrespectful and stupid to say the least. If you are a person who is desperately seeking a spiritual experience I suggest you save whatever money you would spend on one of these dessicated stuffed animals and visit your local mosque, church, synagogue, or guru for FREE and get some real spiritual advice from a real spiritual leader. This “movement” manages to offend anyone who is remotely spiritual and/or has a native/first peoples heritage. Why to go Spirit Hoods, you’ve just won the ass hole company of the year award.

  • Peacelovhorses

    Well your just weird

  • Megan

    To the person(s) who think these spirit hoods offend people who are truly spiritual, you need to educate yourself on the meaning of spirituality. A true spiritual person accepts all living and non living things for who they are and what they do and doesnt discriminate against their beliefs. And FYI, you can take any inanimate object, including those made with “faux fur” and give it spiritual meaning as long as you believe. I have jewlery and many objects that I deem spiritual to me and my beliefs based off of experiences and my life. No one has the right to criticize or judge the people responsible for making spirit hoods a highly popular and must have item, because I have 5 of them and LOVE them. Anyone offended by them and how they came to be needs to go seek out real spiritual help at a mosque/church/guru or whatever because you have no idea what it means to be a spiritual person. Besides, I understand where a lot of people would be bitter seeing someone truly spiritual make a life and career for themselves using their beliefs and talents. Maybe if you all opened your minds, hearts and stopped being so damn judgemental then you too could be successful. But as far as I can see (or in this case read), no one here knows what spiritual really means. Not only am I a prided spiritualist, but I also have PLENTY of Native in my blood, I come from a long line of it, and it doesnt matter what lineage is in anyones blood, spirtuality is spirituality, it doesnt discriminate and it is always the same, and it can be incorporated into anyones life in any which way you chose, as long as you BELIEVE. Besides, negativity attracts negativity, and this blog is unjustly argumentative towards natives, spiritualists and anyone in general who enjoys their spirit hoods. And just because I can, Im gona go order a few more of them right now. Cheers! xx

  • Megan

    To the person(s) who think these spirit hoods offend people who are truly spiritual, you need to educate yourself on the meaning of spirituality. A true spiritual person accepts all living and non living things for who they are and what they do and doesnt discriminate against their beliefs. And FYI, you can take any inanimate object, including those made with “faux fur” and give it spiritual meaning as long as you believe. I have jewlery and many objects that I deem spiritual to me and my beliefs based off of experiences and my life. No one has the right to criticize or judge the people responsible for making spirit hoods a highly popular and must have item, because I have 5 of them and LOVE them. Anyone offended by them and how they came to be needs to go seek out real spiritual help at a mosque/church/guru or whatever because you have no idea what it means to be a spiritual person. Besides, I understand where a lot of people would be bitter seeing someone truly spiritual make a life and career for themselves using their beliefs and talents. Maybe if you all opened your minds, hearts and stopped being so damn judgemental then you too could be successful. But as far as I can see (or in this case read), no one here knows what spiritual really means. Not only am I a prided spiritualist, but I also have PLENTY of Native in my blood, I come from a long line of it, and it doesnt matter what lineage is in anyones blood, spirtuality is spirituality, it doesnt discriminate and it is always the same, and it can be incorporated into anyones life in any which way you chose, as long as you BELIEVE. Besides, negativity attracts negativity, and this blog is unjustly argumentative towards natives, spiritualists and anyone in general who enjoys their spirit hoods. And just because I can, Im gona go order a few more of them right now. Cheers! xx

  • code-jennypenny

    well for those of you that do LOVE SPIRITHOODS, feel free to take 15% off any SpiritHood with the promo code: JENNYPENNY

    oh and btw, she glossed over this briefly above, but a purchase of a hood with a ProBlue logo means 10% goes to that specific animal’s conservation.

    so embrace your inner animal, join the tribe, and spread the love.

    http://www.spirithoods.com
    http://www.spirithoods.com/problue

  • Guest

    wow, someone is taking a freaking hat way too seriously lol chill out and instead of being defensive and pissed off, be humble and saddened by it…nothing you can do will stop them from selling things and donating money to an actually worthy cause. It’s not that bad if you think about it, but because people take stuff way too personal, it turns into a huge vent fest. And btw, if you think about halloween, people can take things just as offensively by people mocking cultures. Let them do their thing, and do yours in a respectful manor. I would have more respect for you if you weren’t so sarcastic and if you were more mature.

  • Guest

    wow, someone is taking a freaking hat way too seriously lol chill out and instead of being defensive and pissed off, be humble and saddened by it…nothing you can do will stop them from selling things and donating money to an actually worthy cause. It’s not that bad if you think about it, but because people take stuff way too personal, it turns into a huge vent fest. And btw, if you think about halloween, people can take things just as offensively by people mocking cultures. Let them do their thing, and do yours in a respectful manor. I would have more respect for you if you weren’t so sarcastic and if you were more mature.